Graduate Students

G. Nathanael Schwarz

nathaniel_dsc_6232-2Nathanael is a clinical psychology doctoral student currently in his fifth year. He received his undergraduate degree in Psychology from the University of Virginia. As a research assistant at the Early Development Lab at University of Virginia, he assisted in a study investigating relations between spontaneous pretend play and theory of mind skills in typically developing children and also investigated pretend play as a potential strategy to regulate emotions. At the Virginia Affective Neuroscience Laboratory, he assisted in a study investigating the effects of social support of a romantic partner on cognitive performance under stress. Nathanael is interested in the intersection of cognitive (attention and executive functioning) and emotional difficulties consequences for everyday functioning in youth with neurodevelopmental disorders (including Williams syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, Autism, ADHD).

Nathanael’s current work involves investigating relations between inhibition, emotion regulation and adaptive functioning in youth with Williams syndrome. He is also interested in the measurement of executive functioning in youth with lower cognitive functioning (including as measures of treatment outcome) and is currently investigating the correspondence of executive functioning performance and parent rated executive functioning behaviors in youth with Williams Syndrome. Additionally, he is interested in using advanced statistical methods for cross-sectional and longitudinal data to investigate questions of typical and atypical development.

Brianna Yund

Brianna is a clinical psychology doctoral student currently in her fourth year. She received her undergraduate degree in Psychology from the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities. Prior to beginning graduate school, Brianna spent several years working as a data coordinator and psychometrist in the UMN’s department of Pediatric Clinical Behavioral Neuroscience, on a NIH-funded longitudinal study examining the natural history and treatment outcomes of individuals with MPS types I, II, and VI. She also worked on a study examining the behavioral phenotype of children with MPS type IIIA.

Brianna is interested in pediatric neuropsychology and her research interests involve the study of the unique behavioral and neuropsychological profiles of individuals with rare genetic disorders, as well as the overlaps in profiles of children with rare genetic disorders and those with more common developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder. Her current work involves the delineation of the behavioral phenotype of children with 7q11.23 duplication syndrome. She also works on a follow-up study examining the cognitive and psychosocial profiles of school-aged children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

Kristin Lee

Kristin is a clinical psychology doctoral student currently in her third year. She received her undergraduate degree in Neuroscience and Behavior from Vassar College. As an undergraduate, she spent several summers interning at the University of Hawai’i Neuroscience and MRI Research lab. After earning her BA, Kristin continued to work in this lab as a research assistant where she worked on projects examining the brain structure and cognitive functioning of typically developing children and adolescent marijuana users. Additionally, Kristin worked on a project that examined the use of a working memory training program for participants with human immunodeficiency virus. Kristin received a masters in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Hawai’i. Her thesis investigated the influence of having a family history of substance use disorders on cortical morphometry in typically developing children.

Kristin is interested in pediatric neuropsychology and her interests involve investigating the cognitive functioning and pre-academic abilities of young children with genetic disorders. She current work involves examining psychosocial functioning in young children with Williams syndrome. Kristin also works on a follow-up study examining the cognitive and psychosocial profiles of school-aged children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

Dani Glad

Dani is a clinical psychology doctoral student currently in her first year. She received her undergraduate degree in Biology with a minor in Psychology from the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. As an undergraduate, Dani worked on an observational research study in the field of behavioral ecology. Prior to beginning graduate school, Dani spent over two years working at a neurology clinic, developing and expanding her interests in psychology, specifically in neuropsychology.

Dani is interested in pediatric neuropsychology and her research interests involve examining the neuropsychological profiles of children with various neurodevelopmental disorders. She is currently working on a study examining the cognitive and psychosocial profiles of young-aged children with neurofibromatosis type 1.


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