ASAIL | MLA 2020 CFPs!

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) | Guaranteed Panel

The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures invites submissions for a guaranteed panel on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) to be presented at the 2020 MLA Convention taking place 9-12 January 2020 in Seattle, Washington.

We invite submissions on literatures concerning Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG). Including, but not limited to, writings on the following related topics: National Day of Awareness for MMIWG, Women’s Memorial March, Highway of Tears, Canadian National Inquiry, Washington State House Bill 2951, Annual Indigenous Women’s Candlelight Memorial Vigil in Seattle, Anna Mae Aquash, REDress Project, the 2017 film Wind River, the Who Killed Alberta Williams? podcast, the community-based art installation Walking with Our Sisters, Sisters in Spirit Vigils, the play Big Green Sky, #AmINext or #idlenomore or other social media outlets, and/or additional MMIWG literatures.

Please send 300-word abstracts, brief (1-2 pp.) CVs, and AV requests to Brian J Twenter (University of Minnesota Morris) and Laura De Vos (University of Washington) at btwenter@morris.umn.edu and lmdevos@uw.edu by 27 March 2019.

Presenters must be members of the Modern Languages Association by 7 April 2019. This is a guaranteed panel, the session proposal will be accepted, and selected panelists will be informed before 1 April 2019. Information on membership is available on the MLA website: https://www.mla.org/.

 

Indigenous Comics and Graphic Novels | Special Session

The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL) invites submissions for a special panel on Indigenous comics and graphic novels to be presented at the 2020 MLA Convention taking place January 9-12 in Seattle, Washington.

We invite submissions on Indigenous comics from around the world, including collections like Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection, Sovereign Traces, or Deer Woman: An Anthology. Papers could focus on any of the many comics and graphic novels coming from First Nation writers around Canada as well. Presenters could also focus on Indigenous comics institutions, including publishing presses (High Water Press, Native Realties Press), Indigenous led and focused comic shops (Red Planet Books and Comics), or the annual Indigenous Comic Con held in Albuquerque, NM.

Please send 300-word abstracts, brief (1-2 pp.) CVs, and AV Requests to Jeremy M. Carnes (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) at jcarnes@uwm.edu by March 30, 2019.

Selected Panelists will be notified by April 2, 2019 and must be members of the Modern Language Association by April 7, 2019. Information on membership is available on the MLA website: http://mla.org/.

Announcing the Nominees and Recipients of the NALS/ASAIL 2019 Awards

The members of the Native American Literature Symposium and the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures boards are excited to announce the recipients and nominees of the 2019 Beatrice Medicine Published Monograph and Essay Awards and the Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories.

Beatrice Medicine Award for Best Essay:

  1. Shaawano Chad Uran, “Policing Resource Extraction and Human Rights in The Land of the Dead.” Transmotion 4.1 (Recipient)
  2. Shannon Toll. “Maria Tallchief, (Native) America’s Prima Ballerina: Autobiographies of a Postindian Princess.” SAIL 30.1
  3. Drew Lopenzina “William Apess Was Born Here”: Marking William Apess on the Geographical and Cultural Map SAIL 30.2
  4. Anne Stewart “Neoliberal Earthworks”SAIL 30.2
  5. Molly Suzanne McGlennen, “Chasms and Collisions: Native American Women’s Decolonial Labor.” Transmotion 4.1

Beatrice Medicine Award for Best Monograph:

  1. Jenny Davis Talking Indian: Identity and Language Revitalization in the Chickasaw Renaissance. University of Arizona Press. (Recipient)
  2. FarIna King. The Earth Memory Compass: Diné Landscapes and Education in the Twentieth Century. University Press of Kansas.
  3. Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert. Hopi Runners: Crossing the Terrain between Indian and American. University Press of Kansas.
  4. Tai Edwards. Osage Women and Empire: Gender and Power. University Press of Kansas.
  5. Thomas Biolsi. Power and Progress on the Prairie: Governing People on Rosebud Reservation. University of Minnesota Press.
  6. Adam Spry. Our War Paint Is Writers’ Ink: Anishinaabe Literary Transnationalism. SUNY Press.
  7. Kirby Brown.  Stoking the Fire: Nationhood in Cherokee Writing, 1907–1970. University of Oklahoma Press.

Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories:

  1. Terese Marie Mailhot. Heart Berries. Counterpoint Press. (Recipient)
  2. Darnella Davis. Untangling a Red, White, and Black Heritage: A Personal History of the Allotment Era. University of New Mexico Press.
  3. Lynda Teller Pete and Barbara Teller Ornelas. Spider Woman’s Children: Navajo Weavers Today. Thrums Books.
  4. Timothy Cochrane. Gichi Bitobig, Grand Marais: Early Accounts of the Anishinaabeg and the North Shore Fur Trade. University of Minnesota Press.
  5. Jessica Mehta. Drag Me Through the Mess. Unsolicited Press.

Congratulations to all the nominees and to the recipients of these awards!

Call for Reviews

The field of American Indian literature includes poetry, drama, fiction and nonfiction, critical theory, cultural theory, history, and all forms of story in the shape of comics, movies, videos and games.  Tell us what makes you think, answers your questions, or asks for response and revision. What are you reading, watching, playing, scrolling through? Studies in American Indian Literatures welcomes reviews of scholarly and creative works relevant to the field of American Indian literature. Reviews should be at least 500 words and no longer than 1000 words. To submit a review contact SAIL Review Editors, Margaret Noodin (noodin@uwm.eduand Jeremy Carnes (jcarnes@uwm.edu).

Susan Berry Brill de Ramírez (1955-2018)

We are grieved to announce the passing of our friend and colleague Susan Berry Brill de Ramírez. Susan was a generous and brilliant mind and voice in Indigenous literary studies. She was the Caterpillar Professor of English at Bradley University in Peoria, IL, where she started in 1991. In the time since her passing, colleagues have reminisced on the ASAIL listserv, remembering times of sharing hotel rooms with Susan at conferences or discussing any manner of topics with her over food and drink. She was a singularly kind individual. What has stood out in most memories about her is the ways Susan took it upon herself to help those around her. She cared about the people and relationships she had with each of us, which was clear in her devotion to Indigenous studies but also to issues of social justice more broadly

Susan published a multitude of books and articles whose effects will continue to ripple throughout Indigenous studies and beyond. She is the writer of Wittgenstein and Critical Theory (1995), Contemporary American Indian Literatures and the Oral Tradition (1999), Native American Life-History Narratives (2007), Women Ethnographers and Native Women Storytellers (2014), and Make College Work for You (2014), and is the co-editor, with Evelina Zuni Lucero, of Simon J. Ortiz: A Poetic Legacy of Indigenous Continuance (2009).

Susan will be deeply missed by all of her colleagues, each of whom she affected in some way. We wish her well on her journey.

Donations can be made in her memory to the Bradley University English Department. Please make donations stating that they are “In Memory of Dr. Susan Brill de Ramirez for the Bradley University English Department,” 1501 W Bradley Ave., Peoria, IL 61625. Members of the Baha’i faith may make donations to The Baha’i Center, 5209 N. University, Peoria, IL 61604.

Winners of the 2018 Beatrice Medicine and Electa Quinney Awards

The members of the Native American Literature Symposium board are excited to announce the winners of the 2018 Beatrice Medicine Published Monograph and Essay Awards and the Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories.

The 2018 winner of the Beatrice Medicine Award for Published Monograph is Elizabeth Hoover for her book The River is In Us: Fighting Toxics in a Mohawk Community from the University of Minnesota Press.

The 2018 winner of the Beatrice Medicine Award for Published Academic Essay is Marcia G. Anderson for her essay “A Bag Worth a Pony: The Art of the Ojibwe Bandolier Bag,” which is published in the art book of the same name and published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press.

The Beatrice Medicine Awards are funded by the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University (www.reddcenter.byu.edu).

The 2018 winner of the Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories is Linda LeGarde Grover for her book Onigamiising: Seasons of an Ojibwe Year from the University of Minnesota Press.

The Electa Quinney Award is funded by the Electra Quinney Institute for American Indian Education at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (www.uwm.edu/eqi).

Announcing NALS 2018!

The organizers are excited to announce that the 2018 Native American Literature Symposium will take place March 22nd to 24th at Mystic Lake Hotel and Casino in Prior Lake, Minnesota.

Our keynote speaker will be Natalie Diaz, and our luncheon speaker will be Joshua B. Nelson!

Save the date!

Look for the CFP, theme announcement, and more details on September 5th.

Winners of the 2017 Beatrice Medicine and Electa Quinney Awards

The members of the Native American Literature Symposium board are excited to announce the winners of the 2017 Beatrice Medicine Published Monograph and Essay Awards and the Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories.

The 2017 winner of the Beatrice Medicine Award for Published Monograph is Brandy Nālani McDougall for her book Finding Meaning: Kaona and Contemporary Hawaiian Literature (University of Arizona Press)

The 2017 winner of the Beatrice Medicine Award for Published Academic Essay is Jan Johnson for her essay “‘We Were All at Wounded Knee’: The Engaged Resistance of Folk and Rock in the Red Power Era” from the collection Indigenous Pop: Native American Music from Jazz to Hip Hop edited by Jeff Bergland, Jan Johnson, and Kimberli Lee (University of Arizona Press).

The Beatrice Medicine Awards are funded by the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University (www.reddcenter.byu.edu).

The 2017 winner of the Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories is Delphine Red Shirt for her book George Sword’s Warrior Narratives: Compositional Processes in Lakota Oral Tradition (University of Nebraska Press).

The Electa Quinney Award is funded by the Electra Quinney Institute for American Indian Education at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (www.uwm.edu/eqi).

CFP: MLA 2018 ASAIL Panel

CFP: Indigenous Literary Security: Threats, Defenses, and States of Freedom

How do indigenous communities define ‘safety’? Are indigenous languages and literatures increasingly secure or continually in a state of defense?

Please send 250-word abstracts to Miriam Brown Spiers at MBrownSpiers@ucmerced.edu by March 15, 2017.

Native American Literature Symposium 2017 Call For Papers

standing-rock

Photo by Sarah LittleRedFeather, published by the LA Progressive in the essay, “What Would Sitting Bull Do?” by Winona LaDuke, 25 Aug 2016.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS for the 2017 Native American Literature Symposium. Theme: OUR LAND AND WATER (#NoDAPL). March 2-4, 2017.

With literature as a crossroads for knowledge—art, history, politics, science, religion, film, cultural studies—we once again welcome spirited participation on all aspects of Native American studies. We invite proposals for individual papers, panel discussions, readings, exhibits, demonstrations, and workshops. We especially encourage proposals focused on current issues concerning use, appropriation, and claim to native land and water.

Proposals are due November 18, 2016.

This year’s conference will take place at the Mystic Lake Casino Hotel in Prior Lake, Minnesota.

You can learn more about the conference by visiting the NALS website.

NALS is proud to collaborate with the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. ASAIL is a professional academic organization created to promote the study, criticism, and research of American Indian written and oral literary traditions. ASAIL’s current membership includes leading scholars, writers, and activists committed to the interdisciplinary study of American Indian and indigenous languages, cultures, and aesthetic traditions.

Announcing the Winners of the 2016 Beatrice Medicine Awards and the Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories and Call for 2017 Nominations

The members of the Native American Literature Symposium board are excited to announce the winners of the 2016 Beatrice Medicine Published Monograph and Article Awards and the Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories.

The 2016 winner of the Beatrice Medicine Award for Published Monograph is Stephanie Fitzgerald for her book Native Women and Land: Narratives of Dispossession and Resurgence (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2015).

The 2016 winner of the Beatrice Medicine Award for Published Academic Article is Susan Bernardin for her essay “Acorn Soup Is Good Food: L. Frank, News from Native California, and the Intersections of Literary and Visual Arts” (Studies in American Indian Literatures 27.3, 2015).

The Beatrice Medicine Awards are funded by the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University (www.reddcenter.byu.edu).

The 2016 winner of the Electa Quinney Award for Published Stories is Mini Aodla Freeman for the edited collection of stories Life Among the Qallunaat, edited by Keavy Martin, Julie Rak, and Norma Dunning.

The Electa Quinney Award is funded by the Electra Quinney Institute for American Indian Education at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (www.uwm.edu/eqi).

Nominations for the 2017 Beatrice Medicine Awards and the Electa Quinney Award are now open. Please email Margaret Noodin with full citation information for your nomination. All nominations must be submitted by January 15, 2017.

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