Renewal of Allied Status for ASAIL

2006 REPORT TO THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE

OF THE MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION

FOR RENEWAL OF ALLIED STATUS FOR

THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURES (ASAIL)

The members of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL), an allied organization of the Modern Language Association, petition the Program Committee of MLA to renew ASAIL’s allied status.

I. HISTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURES (ASAIL), 1999-2006.

The last seven years have seen significant developments in ASAIL’s mandate, which broadly includes the following: (a) promoting the rigorous and respectful study, criticism, and research in the oral traditions and literatures of Indigenous peoples throughout North America; (b) encouraging scholarship that attends to the sociopolitical priorities of Indigenous peoples and nationhood; (c) providing strong mentorship and professionalization opportunities for graduate students and junior scholars in the field; (d) expanding access to relevant pedagogical resources through conferences and the ASAIL listserve; and (d) drawing on the work of established literary voices, senior scholars, and elders, while also expanding the range of texts, critical perspectives, and analytical considerations in new and exciting directions.

Since 2002, ASAIL has had a strong relationship with the Native American Literary Symposium (NALS), an annual conference organized by a group of Native scholars in the field (the “Clan Mothers”) and held in Native-owned venues throughout the United States. With the Clan Mothers’ generous permission, ASAIL’s annual business meeting is now held at NALS as both a symbolic and physical reminder to our membership of the expanded organizational mandate, particularly our commitment to linking literary studies to the lived realities of Indigenous peoples.

This shift in location of our business meeting has not, however, resulted in a lessening of our participation in the MLA. ASAIL has maintained a consistent and engaged presence at the MLA annual convention, with at least two sponsored panels each year, along with a cross-fertilization of both members and ideas with our annual convention meeting that takes place in association with the MLA Division on American Indian Literatures. The panels are consistently well-attended, and they have long been a forum through which new members (at least fifteen each year) are introduced to the Association and its resources.

Our active work at the MLA convention in introducing scholars to the cutting-edge of research in the field of American Indian literatures is just one example of our suitability for continuing our allied status. Three others include our journal, Studies in American Indian Literatures (SAIL), our official association website, and the ASAIL listserv, all of which provide resources to established and emerging scholars (as well as interested laypeople and community members).

Studies in American Indian Literatures is the only scholarly journal in the United States and Canada that focuses exclusively on American Indian literatures (Series 1: 1977-1987; Series 2, 1989-present). The journal was, for many years, published quarterly out of the University of Richmond under the careful supervision of our various editors and our long-time treasurer (now historian), Robert Nelson. As the field and our mandate expanded, so to did our needs, and in 2003, the journal’s editor, Malea Powell, and ASAIL’s former president, Chadwick Allen, signed a contract with the University of Nebraska Press for a publishing agreement between the Association and the Press. The journal began publishing quarterly with the Press with Series 2, Volume 16, Number 1 (Spring 2004).

As a result, SAIL’s profile has increased significantly: it is available to a much broader audience, as it is now prominently featured alongside the Press’s other outstanding Native Studies journals and monographs; it is accessible electronically through Project Muse; and it is now indexed through Thomson Arts and Humanities Index and ERIC. [See sample copies of journal included with Report.]

Our website ( http://facultystaff.richmond.edu/~rnelson/ ASAIL/) not only includes Association information (bylaws, meeting minutes and notes, calls for papers, and announcements), it is also regularly updated with pedagogy and professionalization resources, including course syllabi and outlines, recent books of interest, an up-todate list of Native Studies programs in the United States and Canada, and full-text past issues of SAIL (pre-V.16).

The ASAIL listserv, which includes 268 subscribers, is very active, and provides a core group of our members with the most up-to-date information on scholarship in the field, including vigorous discussions about issues of significance in Native literary studies. The listserv, which is maintained by David Payne at the University of Georgia, and the website, maintained by Robert Nelson, have replaced ASAIL Notes as the immediate forum for disciplinary and Association news, business, and resources. Much of the information provided on the listserv is subsequently archived on our website for easy access to both ASAIL members and the broader public.

The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures has continued its long and productive collaboration with the Division on American Indian

Literatures through coordinating panel sessions during a joint meeting at each convention. Our members are also active on the committee on Literatures and languages of America and the MLA Delegate Assembly.

II. ONGOING ACTIVITY

With an active and engaged membership, ASAIL continues its long history of participation in the national MLA convention, as well as other symposia and conferences throughout the United States [see Appendix B for ASAIL-sponsored MLA programs from 1999-2006].

Our members, both individual and institutional, are kept informed about upcoming conferences and publication calls for papers through our website, listserv, and journal.

As discussed in Section I of this report, ASAIL has strengthened its reputation as the premier site for Native literary scholarship through the expanded profile of Studies in American Indian Literatures. In recognition of the organization’s commitment to both the broader scholarly community and Indigenous communities throughout North America, ASAIL provides free subscriptions of the journal to tribal colleges, thus strengthening the reciprocal link between Native peoples and the scholarship that represents them. Each issue of SAIL also includes addresses for the official governments of the tribal nations referenced in the issue, thus providing scholars with contact information to further responsible scholarship in the field.

III. DIVERSE PARTICIPATION IN ASAIL ACTIVITIES

While focusing on the literatures and languages of the Indigenous Americas, as per our mandate, ASAIL is inclusive of a diverse and interdisciplinary constituency that includes scholars and non-academics, both Native and non-Native. Our long-time commitment to supporting Indigenous scholars and writers in the

IV. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures was founded in 1972.

The purpose of the organization shall be to promote study, criticism, and research on the oral traditions and literatures of Native Americans; to promote the teaching of such traditions and literatures; and to support and encourage contemporary Native American writers and the continuity of Native American oral traditions.

V. ASAIL BYLAWS

Please see Appendix C for ASAIL’s bylaws, which were revised and approved by ASAIL membership in March 1991, with subsequent amendments approved in 2002 and 2004.

VI. CURRENT MEMBERSHIP

ASAIL currently has around 280 individual and 140 institutional members and subscribers. The membership has a broadly international scope, with representation from many different countries, including Canada, the United States, Mexico, Argentina, Germany, Italy, England, and New Zealand. Please see Appendix D for a sample membership application.

VII. DESCRIPTION OF DUES STRUCTURE

ASAIL maintains four categories of association membership:

Individual membership $ 30

Limited income membership $ 20

Sponsor $ 50

Patron $ 100

ASAIL’s publishing agreement with the University of Nebraska Press provides for a $75 institutional subscription price for SAIL.

Benefits of ASAIL membership include subscriptions to SAIL and the ASAIL listserv; donations at the Sponsor and Patron level are acknowledged in the first issue of each volume year.

Respectfully submitted,

Daniel Heath Justice, President (2004-2006)

Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL)

APPENDIX A

Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures

Executive Committees, 1999-2006

2006-2007

President: Debra K.S. Barker, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (2006-2008); Vice-President: Patrice E.M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (2006-2008); Secretary: Lisa Tatonetti, Kansas State University (2005-2007); Treasurer: Siobhan Senier, University of New Hampshire (2005-2007); Historian: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond (standing officer); [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto (2006-2011)

2005-2006

President: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto (2004-2006); Vice-President: Debra K.S. Barker, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (2004-2006; President, 20062008); Secretary: Lisa Tatonetti, Kansas State University (2005-2007); Treasurer: Siobhan Senier, University of New Hampshire (2005-2007); Historian: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond (standing officer); [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Malea Powell, Michigan State University (2000-2006)

2004-2005

President: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto; Vice-President: Debra K.S. Barker, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire; Secretary: Patrice Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Treasurer-elect: Siobhan Senier; Historian: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Malea Powell, Michigan State University

2003-2004

President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University; Vice-President: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto; Secretary: Patrice Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond**

2002-2003

President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University; Vice-President: Deborah Miranda, University of Washington; Secretary: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond

2001-2002

President: Joyzelle Godfrey; Vice-President: Deborah Miranda, University of Washington; Secretary: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond

2000-2001

President: Joyzelle Godfrey; Vice-President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University; Secretary: Malea Powell, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond

1999-2000

President: Ginny Carney, University of Kentucky; Vice-President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University; Secretary: Ruth Rosenberg; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond

**Since the ASAIL treasury was, for many years, so intimately connected to the SAIL mailing list, and since the journal had been produced at the University of Richmond from late 1989 to 2003, the Association voted in 1995 to suspend a bylaw in order to re-elect Robert Nelson as a standing officer (Treasurer) of ASAIL. When production of SAIL moved to the University of Nebraska Press in 2003, the Association voted to return to observance of the bylaw, thus opening the position of Treasurer to a general vote of the members. In recognition of Robert Nelson’s long and able service to the Association over many years, and his continuing dedication to the organization and the larger field, the membership voted to create the standing office of Historian and named Nelson the first ASAIL Historian.

APPENDIX B

MLA Programs Arranged by

the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures

1999-2006

2006: Philadelphia (Calls for Papers)

American Indian Literatures in Global Contexts. Presiding: Chadwick Allen

Teaching the American Indian Boarding School Experience. Presiding: Deborah Miranda

2005: Washington, D.C.

Broadening the Conversation: Teaching beyond the Canonical Native Writers. Presiding: Debra K.S. Barker, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire; Connie Augustine Jacobs, San Juan College

Speakers: Granville Ganter, Saint John’s University, NY; Virginia Kennedy, University of Scranton; Siobhan Senier, University of New Hampshire, Durham; Kenneth Morrison Roemer, University of Texas, Arlington; James K. Ruppert, University of Alaska, Fairbanks

Ethics and American Indian Cultures. Presiding: Christina A. Roberts, University of Arizona

1. “‘Nobody Wants to Hear These Things’: Academic Freedom and Ethics in Teaching Sherman Alexie’s ‘Can I Get a Witness?,'” Patrice E. M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2. “Modes of Ethnographic and Ethical Inquiry in Teaching American Indian Texts,” Karen Lee Osborne, Columbia College, IL

3. Creating Ethical Learning Communities,” Laura J. Beard, Texas Tech University

2004: Philadelphia

Problems in Applying Feminist Theory to Native American Literature. Presiding: Patrice E.M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

1. “Navajo Womanhood in Luci Tapahonso’s ‘Blue Horses Rush In,'” Tereza M. Szeghi, University of Arizona

2. “Ignatia Broker’s Lived Feminism: Toward a Native Women’s Theory,” Molly McGlennen, University of California, Davis

3. “Feminism, Nation, and the Fourth World: A Comparative Approach to Indigenous American Women’s Writing,” Janet McAdams, Kenyon College

American Indian Literature and Visual Culture. Presiding: Dean Rader, University of San Francisco

1. “Speaking Chinook: Multicultural Images in the Self-Representations and Pacific Coast Stories of E. Pauline Johnson,” Martha L. Viehmann, Northern Kentucky University

2. “Liberating Words: Texts and Contexts in Edgar Heap of Bird’s ‘Wheel,'” Robert A. Warrior, University of Oklahoma

3. “Claiming Another Homeland: Native Novelists and Visual Artists Look to Europe,” Lee F. Schweninger, University of North Carolina, Wilmington

4. “Cinema and Poetry: Sherwin Bitsui’s Intertexual Performance,” Angelica M. Lawson, Dartmouth College

2003: San Diego

Opening Our Canon: Teaching Lesser-Known Native Writers. Presiding: Virginia I. Carney, Leech Lake Tribal College

1. “Land Speaking in Whispers: Jeanette Armstrong’s Indigenist Fiction,” Joanne R. DiNova, Corunna, Ontario

2. “Esther Belin and Laura Tohe: Urban and Traditional DinĂ© (Navajo) Poetry,” P. Jane Hafen, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

3. “Teaching LeAnne Howe’s Shellshaker with a Tribalography Approach,” Patrice E.M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

“The Dirt Is Red Here”: Literature and Art of Native California. Presiding: Deborah A. Miranda, Pacific Lutheran University

Speakers: Greg Sarris, Loyola Marymount University; Sylvia Ross, Lemon Grove, CA; L. Frank Manriquez, Sebastopol, CA; Frank LaPena, California State University, Sacramento

2002: New York City

Native Literature in Native Classrooms: The Challenge of Teaching in a Tribal College. Presiding: Patrice E.M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

1. “Higher Education and the Ancient Knowledge of the Ojibway,” Michael W. price, Red Lake Nation College

2. “The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: The Challenge of Teaching in a Tribal College,” Virginia I. Carney, Leech Lake Tribal College

Constructing Indigenous Consciousness in Colonizing Languages. Presiding: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto

1. “Speaking for Ourselves,” Simon J. Ortiz, University of Toronto

2. “Languages of the Indigenous Web,” David A. Golumbia, Long Beach, CA

3. “Evidence of Indigenous Consciousness in a Colonizing Language: Resilience and Resistance in the Poetry of Ofelia Zepeda,” Angelica M. Lawson, University of Arizona

4. “Lost in Translation: Expressing Haida Ideology in English,” Frederick White, Slippery Rock University

2001: New Orleans

Teaching American Indian Literatures in Multicultural Contexts. Presiding: Eric Gary Anderson, Oklahoma State University

1. “‘Remember, We Are Dancing a Revolution’: A Nonutopic Approach to Teaching Multiculturalism,” Timothy Burgess Powell, University of Georgia

2. “Dances with Poles: Teaching American Indian Literatures to Eastern Europeans; or, A Survival Manual for Cultural Critique outside of the Americas,” Alexia Kosmider, University of Rhode Island

3. “Two Indians: A Comparative Approach to Teaching American Indian and South Asian American Literature in the Multiethnic Classroom,” Karen M. Cardozo-Kane, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

4. “Talking Cultures, Teaching U.S. Literatures Relationally,” AnaLouise Keating, Texas Woman’s University

American Indian Protest Literatures. Presiding: Malea D. Powell, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

1. “The Good, the Bad, and Elias Boudinot: Bringing the Literatures of American Indian Protest and Accommodation into Dialogue,” Stephen J. Brandon, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

2. “‘Remember Wounded Knee’: The American Indian Movement and Twenty-First-Century Protest,” Elizabeth Mary Rich, Saginaw Valley State University

3. “Heartspeak from the Spirit: John Trudell’s Message of Resistance,” Kim Lee, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

4. “Indigenous Reading, Sovereign Theory,” Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University, Columbus

2000: Washington, D.C.

Uncanonized American Indian and First Nations Writers. Presiding: Malea D. Powell, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

1. “Raven and the American Dream: Robert Davis and Tlingit Poetics,” Susan Elizabeth Kollin, Montana State University, Bozeman

2. “‘Mother of U.S. Senator an Indian Queen’: Cultural Challenge and Appropriation in The Memoirs of Narcissa Owens,” Stephen J. Brandon, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

3. “Claiming a Voice: Shirley Sterling’s My Name is Seepeetza,” Laura J. Beard, University de las Americas, Puebla

4. “The Creation of Deviance: Janet Hale’s The Jailing of Cecilia Capture,” Sandra K. Baringer, University of California, Riverside

Teaching Native American Literature from an Indigenous Perspective. Presiding: Joanne R. DiNova, University of Waterloo, ON. Respondent: Gwen N. Griffin, Minnesota State University

1. “Introducing Alaska Native Oral Literatures: A Haida Raven Story,” Jeane Breinig, University of Alaska, Anchorage

2. “‘So Where’s Your Headdress?’: Teaching against Stereotypes in the Native Lit Classroom,” Daniel H. Justice, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

3. “Teaching American Indian Literature to American Indian Students,” Joyzelle Godfrey, Lower Brule Community College, SD

1999: Chicago

North American Literatures in Indigenous Languages. Presiding: Joanne R. DiNova, University of Waterloo

1. “The Joys and Sorrows of Talking on the Page,” Nora Marks Dauenhauer, Sealaska Corp.

2. “Sustaining Our Culture: The Revitalization of the Cherokee Language,” Lynne Harlan, Cherokee, NC; Marie Junaluska, Cherokee, NC

3. “Naming Metaphor: Who Defines Raven in Native Literature?” Lee Maracle, University of Toronto

Teaching Native American Literature from an Indigenous Perspective. Presiding: Virginia I. Carney, Eastern Kentucky University

1. “Teaching Tribal Sovereignty or Colonial Identity? Advocacy and the Politics of Complexity,” David Lewis Moore, University of Montana

2. “Rhetorical Sovereignty and Native Literatures: From the Perspective of Indigenism,” Scott Richard Lyons, Miami University, Oxford

3. “Confronting Bigotry, Teaching Compassion: A Historical Approach to Teaching Native American Literature,” Janice M. Gould, Portland Community College, OR

A Reading by Susan Power (Yanktonnai Dakota)

Program arranged by MLA Committee on the Literatures and Languages of America, the MLA Division on American Indian Literatures, the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures, and the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History, Newberry Library

APPENDIX C

ASAIL Bylaws

Approved January 4, 1991; amended 2002, 2004

I. Name of the organization. The name of the organization shall be The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures.

II. Purpose. The purpose of the organization shall be to promote study, criticism, and research on the oral traditions and written literatures of Native Americans; to promote the teaching of such traditions and literatures; and to support and encourage contemporary Native American writers and the continuity of Native oral traditions.

III. Membership. There shall be three categories of membership. The dues within each category shall be established by the Executive Committee following consultation with association members at a business meeting.

A. Regular membership. Educators professionally interested in the above-stated purpose of the organization or persons otherwise active in furthering such goals may become regular members of the association.

B. Limited income membership. Persons retired from professions relevant to the above-stated purpose and Native American writers may apply for membership in this category. Also, graduate students engaged in courses of study in Native American oral traditions or writing may for a maximum of four years become members at this level, provided they do not hold full-time teaching positions.

C. Patron. Persons who contribute at higher financial levels than required for regular membership may join the association at this level.

D. Honorary membership. Honorary membership may be granted to distinguished persons of letters and scholars of any nationality upon nomination by the Executive Committee and election by the membership at an association business meeting.

E. Only members in good standing may hold office in the association and vote in association elections and meetings.

IV. Officers–Responsibilities

A. The officers of the association shall be a president, a vice-president, a secretary and a treasurer.

B. With the advice of the Executive Committee, the president shall administer the affairs of the association. The president shall preside at meetings of the Executive Committee and at associate business meetings. Also, the president shall communicate regularly with members through the association journal concerning association business.

C. The vice-president shall preside at all Executive Committee meetings and business meetings from which the president must be absent. In addition, the vice-president shall assume presidential administrative duties when so requested by the president and the Executive Committee and shall serve as liaison with other organizations whose professional purposes correspond to ASAIL’s.

D. The secretary shall record the minutes of Executive Committee meetings and of membership business meetings. A summary of business meeting minutes shall be published in the association journal as soon as feasible following each meeting. The secretary shall also preserve minutes of all meetings for five years and shall pass these on to the succeeding secretary.

E. The treasurer shall collect and manage association funds (including keeping accurate and current records of association income, assets, and expenses) so as to further association goals. As major instruments for achieving these goals, the association journal and newsletter shall receive priority in the expenditure of association funds. In addition, the treasurer shall maintain accurate and current membership lists and shall answer all queries regarding membership. The treasurer shall also make financial reports at Executive Committee meetings and at association business meetings. The association financial records shall be available to the Executive Committee upon request.

V. Officers — Election.

A. Officers shall be elected from among current membership.

B. {Amended 2002} The slate of nominees for election shall be prepared by the Election Committee prior to the association’s annual business meeting at the Native American Literature Symposium.

C. {Amended 2002} Election of officers shall be by secret ballot at the annual business meeting during the Native American Literature Symposium. However, in unusual and compelling circumstances, the Executive Committee may, with the approval of the members present at this meeting, choose to conduct the election by mail ballot.

D. Terms and Sequence of Elections

1. The initial election officers shall be conducted as follows: In December, 1991, the president and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms; the vice-president and the secretary shall be elected to one year terms.

2. Beginning with the elections of officers in December, 1992, the election sequence shall be as follows: The president and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms in odd-numbered years; the vice-president and the secretary shall be elected to two year terms in even-numbered years.

3.{Amended 2002} Beginning with the elections of officers in March, 2004, the election sequence shall be as follows: the secretary and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms in each odd-numbered year; the president shall automatically be succeeded by the vice-president, and a new vice-president elected, in each even-numbered year.

E. Neither the president nor the vice-president may be elected to consecutive terms.

VI. Executive Committee

A. The Executive Committee shall meet as often as feasible to conduct association business. In any event, the Committee shall meet at least once a year at the Modern Language Association convention and once prior to the business meeting at the association’s own convention, if any.

B. {Amended 2004} The membership of the Executive Committee shall include the president, the vice-president, the secretary, the treasurer, the editor of the association journal, and the association historian.

C. The responsibilities of the Committee shall be:

1. to further the goals of the organization;

2. to initiate and supervise the services of the association;

3. to approve the budget of the association and to supervise its expenditure and to act on proposals regarding dues structure and subscription rates for publications;

4. to make recommendations to the membership, to act on recommendations by members, and to inform members of actions taken;

5. to establish and discharge committees, either on recommendation of the membership or on its own initiative, and to designate their chairs;

6. {Amended 2004} to oversee publications, media, and archives of the association, including appointing, assisting, and advising the editor of the association journal and the association historian;

7. to plan conventions and other meetings of the association.

VII. Association Meetings.

A. {Amended 2002} The association shall hold business meetings during either the Native American Literature Symposium or its own convention, if any, and during the annual Modern Language Association convention.

B. The association shall hold conventions at times and places determined by the Executive Committee. In an emergency, the Executive Committee shall have the power to cancel a convention.

C. Conventions shall be planned by the Executive Committee with the advice of a program committee appointed by the Executive Committee.

D. Association sessions at the annual Modern Language Association convention shall be planned by session chairs appointed by the Executive Committee.

VIII. Amendments.

A. Proposals for amendments to these by-laws may be initiated by the Executive Committee or by any association member.

B. {Amended 2002} All amendments to be brought before the membership shall be published at least ninety days before the business meeting at which they are to be voted on or mailed to members at least thirty days before the business meeting.

C. Amendments must be approved by a majority of those voting at the business meeting. With the approval of those present at such a meeting, the Executive Committee may choose to conduct the voting among the entire membership by mail.

IX. Dissolution.

A. The association may be dissolved only by a vote of the members present at a special meeting called for that purpose.

B. On the dissolution of the association, all property remaining after the satisfaction of the association’s obligations shall be distributed as the Executive Committee directs, choosing the recipients from non-profit Native American educational institutions whose goals are consistent with the interests of the association.

N.B. At the 12/29/90 business meeting, the membership directed the officers to proceed with incorporation. If the above document is passed by ASAIL members, the officers shall take such acceptance as authority to add to the by-laws immediately (without recourse to the above amending procedure) such language as incorporation may require.

APPENDIX D

Sample Membership Application

A S A I L

Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures

c/o Siobhan Senier

Dept of English

Univ of New Hampshire

Hamilton Smith Hall

95 Main St.

Durham NH 03824

Thank you for your interest in ASAIL. One of our primary purposes in the Association is to keep our members informed of recent publications and developments in the field of American Indian Literatures. ASAIL’s dues-paying membership is open to all individuals and institutions interested in furthering the goals of the Association. Benefits of ASAIL membership include participation in the ASAIL electronic discussion group, voting privileges at the annual ASAIL meeting held during the MLA Convention, and a subscription to SAIL: Studies in American Indian Literatures. Published quarterly, SAIL is the only journal in the United States which focuses exclusively on American Indian literatures. With a wide scope of scholars and creative contributors, the journal is always on the cutting edge of activity in the field.

2006 Association membership rates are listed below.

Copies of the 1993 (v.5) through 2003 (v.15) volumes of SAIL are still available to individuals for $25 and to institutions for $35. For issues and volumes from 2004 onward, please contact University of Nebraska Press.

Please mail payment (in U.S. dollars only, please–check, money order, or cash are all acceptable) and this form to ASAIL Membership / c/o Siobhan Senier / Dept of English / Univ of New Hampshire / Hamilton Smith Hall / 95 Main St. / Durham NH 03824. Note: all checks and money orders must be made payable to “UNH.”

ASAIL membership rates for 2006: (circle one)

REGULAR INDIVIDUAL $30

LIMITED INCOME 20

SPONSOR 50

PATRON 100

Overseas members: please add $20 for SAIL postage

BACK ISSUES: @ $25 each (individuals) / $35 each (institutions) (circle vol[s]. ordered):

VOL.5 (1993) VOL.9 (1997) VOL.13 (2001)

VOL.6 (1994) VOL.10 (1998) VOL.14 (2002)

VOL.7 (1995) VOL.11 (1999) VOL.15 (2003)

VOL.8 (1996) VOL.12 (2000)

(For issues and volumes 2004 – , please contact University of Nebraska Press)

TOTAL ENCLOSED $___________

NAME__________________________________________________ PHONE___________________

MAILING ADDRESS_____________________________________________E-MAIL______________

CITY________________________________________STATE___________ZIPCO DE____________

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